Critelli's Furniture & Mattress and Transitions Furniture in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
126 King Street, St. Catharines
Ontario, Canada
(877) 322-1172
(905) 684-8108

Mon. - Sat. 10am to 6pm
Fri. 10am to 8pm - Sun Closed

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Long Gallery Console Tables

Theodore Alexander

Item #: AL53043

61W X 34H X 16D

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Inspired by the writing table in the Long Gallery at Althorp. The original table is attributed to Paul Saunders. It was supplied to John Spencer, later 1st Earl Spencer (1734-83) between 1755 and 1760, probably for Althorp, but possibly for Spencer House. Saunders supplied several suites of furniture to the Spencers around the same period as the desk. Several suites of seat furniture have been identified as being from his workshop. Saunders had formed a partnership around 1751 with George Smith Bradshaw, establishing workshops in Soho Square, London. He worked extensively at Petworth House, Sussex from 1748, at Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire, Holkham, Norfolk and at Longleat, Somerset. The table is designed in the French 'picturesque' or Rococo style, first popularised in Thomas Chippendale's The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director, 1754. Chippendale’s designs were avidly used by contemporary cabinetmakers as references. This table specifically references a French Commode Table on Plate XLVI in its overall form and delicate design and decoration of the cabriole legs. The serpentine form was praised as the 'line of beauty' in The Analysis of Beauty, 1753, by William Hogarth, artist and founder of London's fashionable school of design in St. Martin's Lane. Chippendale adopted the style for the French armchair that served as the shop-sign of his St. Martin's Lane workshops established in the early 1750s. While bronze or ormolu ornament had largely replaced carving on fashionable Parisian cabinet-furniture, Chippendale explained that his Director ornament could either be executed in brass or carved, as is the case with this library table. The Picture Gallery remains very much as it was created by Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland (1641-1702). Educated at Oxford, he travelled extensively on the ‘Grand Tour’ in France, Italy and Spain and afterwards followed an active diplomatic career with appointments to Madrid (1671), Paris (1672), Cologne (1673), The Hague (1678). With both discernment and the opportunity for acquiring pictures on the continent, he was the first member of the Spencer family to collect paintings. Many of the fine scalloped frames in the gallery which he had made in either Italy or Spain, particularly those round the Lely portraits, are known as ‘Sunderlands’. The Picture Gallery is based on the original Elizabethan gallery in the south-west wing of the house. It is 115 feet long, 20 feet wide and 19 feet high. On entering, to the left are a series of portraits of the beauties of Charles II’s court painted and signed by Sir Peter Lely. At the south end and focal point of the gallery, is Van Dyck’s (1599-1641) famous whole-length double portrait (c.1637) known as War and Peace, representing the brothers-in-law George Digby, Second Earl of Bristol, and William Russell, First Duke of Bedford.

Please note that the finish or fabric of this product in-store may be different than the photo currently pictured. Please contact your local store to confirm product pricing, availability, finish and fabric colors and promotional dates.

Model Number AL53043
CollectionAlthorp Living History
FeaturesTables
Storage
Wood Leg
Rectangular
Console
CategoryLiving Room » Occasional Tables